Category Archives: Religion

Sean Feucht: God is the ‘answer and hope for America’ amid ‘darkness’

Pretty good… mrossol

Sean Feucht: God is the ‘answer and hope for America’ amid ‘darkness’

A prominent musician and worship leader stressed the importance of turning to faith at a time of national strife, describing God as “the answer and the hope for America.”

Nearly two years into the coronavirus pandemic, Sean Feucht reflected on his efforts to bring the Word of God to as many people as possible as cities across the U.S. imposed worship restrictions in an appearance on “Fox News Primetime” Tuesday.

Feucht, who describes himself as a “missionary, artist, speaker, author [and] activist,” founded the “Let Us Worship” movement, a series of outdoor worship events that took place as coronavirus restrictions banned in-person church services and, in some cases, prevented people from singing. https://www.youtube.com/embed/yyGVJZCFJV4?feature=oembed

Feucht discussed his latest endeavor with Fox News host Ben Domenech, where he mentioned that he was “launching a new tour kicking off in Miami on New Year’s Eve.”

After recalling how “it always seemed like religion was coming last for so many of our political leaders” who “didn’t seem to think it was all that important that people actually be able to gather and worship together” during the pandemic, Domenech asked Feucht “why was it important for you to make sure that that still happened?”

“It wasn’t America that founded religious liberty, religious liberty founded America,” Feucht replied. “It’s essential to who we are.”

Feucht concluded that religious liberty was even more essential “especially in a time of a pandemic; especially in a time where there’s such division and there’s such isolation.” He maintained that “we got to get together, we got to worship, we got to seek God. He is the answer and the hope for America.”

Both Feucht and Domenech lamented that many professing people of faith elected to “go along with the policies that were put in place without any kind of objection.” According to Feucht, “We sing these songs, we preach these sermons and yet, when the moment comes, when we got to practice them, it’s like people were … deserted, they just … fell at the feet of the government.”

Feucht also pushed back on the misconception that the Let Us Worship movement was political in nature: “This is not political, this is biblical. … We have a mandate as believers, we’ve been doing it for 2,000 years. We’ve been gathering together … despite pandemics and persecution and fear and crazy tyrannical governors like we have here in California.”

“We’ve been gathering together … and we’ve been worshiping,” he added. “Now more than ever, when Americans are facing such darkness, you know, the light shines in the darkness and the darkness cannot overcome it.”

Feucht elaborated on how the Let Us Worship movement held events in cities ravaged by riots in the weeks after George Floyd’s death in May 2020. Violent rioting nationwide led to over 20 murders, and the torching of homes and small businesses, leaving many people homeless and causing billions of dollars in damages. 

“We went to some of the hardest and darkest cities, cities of rioting like Seattle and … Portland. We went through Los Angeles, South Chicago, and everywhere we went, the story was the same: people gathered needing hope, people gathered needing life.”

“It was like there’s this connection that comes in community that people didn’t have but also a connection to God. And the testimonies are crazy,” Feucht said. “People getting saved, people getting healed, people giving their life to Jesus, getting rid of their addictions. I mean, this is why we did this. This is why we launched Let Us Worship, and we’re not stopping now.” 

Feucht’s appearance on “Fox News Primetime” comes as states and cities across the U.S. are re-implementing coronavirus restrictions, specifically mask mandates, as the Omicron variant of the virus spreads and the U.S. sees a doubling of COVID-19 infections since 2020, setting a new record this week for the average number of daily cases.

In addition to the New Year’s Eve event in Miami mentioned by Domenech, Feucht has already scheduled several Let Us Worship events in 11 states throughout 2022.

In addition to attending Let Us Worship events, Americans had the opportunity to weigh in on restrictions on religious worship at the voting booth. Earlier this year, 62% of Texas voters supported Proposition 3, which bans the state from prohibiting or restricting religious services in the future during any pandemic or natural disaster.

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Cantata Herr, deine Augen sehen nach dem glauben. BWV 102

The impressive opening chorus of ‘Herr, deine Augen sehen nach dem Glauben’, performed by the Netherlands Bach Society for All of Bach, comes straight to the point: the world is full of stubborn unbelievers, and however hard God punishes them, it does not help. The sermon for this tenth Sunday after Trinity is about the expulsion of the money-changers from the temple and the imminent destruction of Jerusalem. The errant souls are called upon to convert while they still can.

Recorded for the project All of Bach on October 11th 2014 at the Grote Kerk, Naarden. If you want to help us complete All of Bach, please subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/2vhCeFB or consider donating http://bit.ly/2uZuMj5.

For the interview with conductor Jos van Veldhoven on ‘Herr, deine Augen sehen nach dem Glauben’ go to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AAXLu…

For the interview with flute player Marten Root and violinist Shunske Sato on BWV 102 go to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dsm_g… For more information on BWV 102 and this production go to http://allofbach.com/en/bwv/bwv-102/

All of Bach is a project of the Netherlands Bach Society / Nederlandse Bachvereniging, offering high-quality film recordings of the works by Johann Sebastian Bach, performed by the Netherlands Bach Society and her guest musicians. Visit our free online treasury for more videos and background material http://allofbach.com/en/. For concert dates and further information go to https://www.bachvereniging.nl/nederla…. Netherlands Bach Society Jos van Veldhoven, conductor Marjon Strijk, soprano Alex Potter, alto Thomas Hobbs, tenor Peter Kooij, bass

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Death of a Martyr

I am not sure I agree completely with the author, but he has some points that bear consideration.
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WSJ 11/26/2018 By Tunku Varadarajan

North Sentinel Island lies 500 miles to the east of India in the Bay of Bengal. It is inhabited by 50 to 150 people—no one knows how many for sure—descended from Stone Age migrants from Africa who settled there 50,000 years ago. Their way of life has changed little since those primordial times. No one in the world outside knows their language.

By anthropological accounts, the Sentinelese are the world’s most isolated and inaccessible people. But John Allen Chau, a 27-year-old missionary from Washington state, also saw them as godforsaken and took it upon himself to convert them to Christianity. “Lord, is this island Satan’s last stronghold,” he wrote in his diary, “where none have heard or even had the chance to hear your name?”

Chau paid for his evangelical foray with his life. Last week— probably on Wednesday—he was killed by Sentinelese men wielding bows and arrows while attempting to approach them on their island. His body was most likely riddled, bringing to mind St. Sebastian, who had arrows showered upon him on the order of Roman Emperor Diocletian. (“And the archers shot at him,” wrote a hagiographer, “till he was as full of arrows as a hedgehog is full of pricks.”) Given the symbolism, and the obvious tragedy of his death, there will be those who ascribe nobility to Chau, and courage. After all, he ventured into hostile territory to propagate his faith. There can be no doubt that he was a devout Christian, even a fanatical one. One suspects that an element of fanaticism has driven missionaries throughout history to venture into far-flung places where they’re not wanted (at least initially). Chau is the latest in a long line of Christian martyrs, although perhaps the first with his own Instagram account.

But go easy on the romance of Chau and his messy, martyred end. He broke Indian law by entering the country on a tourist visa while pursuing an evangelical mission. Chau’s application would have been refused if it so much as mentioned the words “North Sentinel Island.”

No one is permitted to land on the island, not because India disapproves of foreign evangelists— it most emphatically does—but because it has adopted a policy since 1947 (the year of India’s independence) of leaving the Sentinelese entirely to themselves. The policy is called, pithily, “Eyes on, hands off.” The Sentinelese are observed from a very watchful distance, but there is a resolute prohibition on any physical contact with them.

There are epidemiological reasons for this, quite apart from the aesthetic and anthropological ones that advocate the leaving alone of an isolated people whom modern civilization has bypassed. Contact with the outside world—with men like Chau—would likely kill off the Sentinelese. Think flu, measles, chickenpox.

What we had in the end, was one man’s futile—and fatal— theater. But there’s a moral aftermath: The missionary found martyrdom, the Sentinelese a new lease on life. Out of this tragedy will come a vigorous new awareness of who they are, and what they don’t need. And that includes waterproof Bibles.

Mr. Varadarajan, born in India, is executive editor at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution.

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